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    ARTICLE

    sepiaEYE

    Map Academy

    Articles are written collaboratively by the EIA editors. More information on our team, their individual bios, and our approach to writing can be found on our About pages. We also welcome feedback and all articles include a bibliography (see below).

    Established in 2009, sepiaEYE is a former New York-based gallery specialising in modern and contemporary photography, video and mixed-media work from South Asia. Developed from the institutional legacy of Sepia International and the The Alkazi Foundation for the Arts, sepiaEYE participates in exhibitions, festivals, art fairs and publications, and aims to support emerging artists and bring their works into public view.

    sepiaEYE was founded by Esa Epstein after her tenure as executive director and curator at Sepia International and the Alkazi Foundation from 1995–2009. With the inception of sepiaEYE, Epstein inherited much of the Alkazi Foundation archives, which included a number of glass plate negatives, paper negatives, painted photographs, single prints and albums dating from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1940s, made by photographers such as Samuel Bourne, Lala Deen Dayal and John Edward Sache.

    In 2019, sepiaEYE closed their physical gallery space in New York with the aim of expanding their reach, organising exhibitions with museums and institutions around the world with the aim of disseminating Indian and South Asian art. Notable exhibitions include Rectangular Squares (2014), featuring work by Bhupendra Karia, Annu Palakunnathu Matthew and Raghubir Singh; I need my memories. They are my documents. (2015) curated by Nandita Raman and featuring works by Vivan Sundaram, Pradeep Dalal, Shambhavi Kaul, Osamu James Nakagawa and Neal Oshima; and FACE OFF (2018), which featured the works of Vivan Sundaram and Nandita Raman, among others.

    At the time of writing, sepiaEYE represents a number of artists, including Atul Bhalla, Serena Chopra, Bhupendra Karia, Annu Palakunnathu Matthew, Nandita Raman, Charan Singh, Pamela Singh, Vivan Sundaram, Qiana Mestrich and Beatrice Pediconi. The organisation also represents the estate of Bhupendra Karia.

     
    Bibliography

    Allana, Amal. 2015. “Ebrahim Alkazi.” Marg: A Magazine of the Arts, September–December 2015. https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.cul.columbia.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=asu&AN=110236302&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

    Cotter, Holland. 2006. “Art in Review; Vivan Sundaram.” The New York Times. June 30. https://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/30/arts/art-in-review-vivan-sundaram.html.

    Epstein, Esa, and sepiaEYE. 2019. “Closing of the New York City Gallery Space.” sepiaEYE. https://sepia-eye.squarespace.com/news-archive/closingthenewyorkgalleryannouncement.

    Raman, Nandita, and Pradeep Dalal. 2015. “Interview.” International Center of Photography. https://www.icp.org/interviews/pradeep-dalal.

    Raman, Nandita, and Vivan Sundaram. 2016. “Interview.” International Center of Photography. https://www.icp.org/interviews/vivan-sundaram.

    SepiaEYE. n.d. “About/Contact.” sepiaEYE. https://www.sepiaeye.com/contact.

    SepiaEYE. n.d. “Vivan Sundaram.” sepiaEYE. https://www.sepiaeye.com/vivan-sundaram.

    Weathersby Jr., William. 1999. “A New York Photography Center Provides a Passage to India.” Architectural Record, May 1999. https://search-ebscohost-com.ezproxy.cul.columbia.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=asu&AN=503627332&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

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